Jul 052012
 


Magnolia Warbler

Osprey

Tuesday June 12:

Under drizzling skies, a small group of enthusiastic birders and photographers met this morning at Andrew Haydon Park. From here we went straight for the Moodie Drive Quarry Ponds where we had Common Tern, Bank Swallow and Belted Kingfisher.

At the Richmond Lagoons, we had great views of Black-billed Cuckoo, Warbling Vireo, Alder and Willow Flycather. In the distance, we could hear the sweet song of a Rose-breasted Grosbeak.

Unfortunately, the rain got slightly heavier. But, we weren’t ready to finish yet.

We went for a short coffee break to dry up, and fulfill our caffeine needs. We ended the day checking out the area of Constance Creek for Virginia Rail and Osprey.

Despite the nasty weather, we had a day list of 56 species.

Canada Goose

Branta canadensis

Wood Duck

Aix sponsa

Mallard

Anas platyrhynchos

Wild Turkey

Meleagris gallopavo

Common Loon

Gavia immer

Double-crested Cormorant

Phalacrocorax auritus

Great Blue Heron

Ardea herodias

Osprey

Pandion haliaetus

Northern Harrier

Circus cyaneus

Killdeer

Charadrius vociferus

Spotted Sandpiper

Actitis macularius

Wilson’s Snipe

Gallinago delicata

Ring-billed Gull

Larus delawarensis

Herring Gull

Larus argentatus

Common Tern

Sterna hirundo

Rock Pigeon

Columba livia

Mourning Dove

Zenaida macroura

Black-billed Cuckoo

Coccyzus erythropthalmus

Belted Kingfisher

Megaceryle alcyon

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

Sphyrapicus varius

Hairy Woodpecker

Picoides villosus

Northern Flicker

Colaptes auratus

Alder Flycatcher

Empidonax alnorum

Willow Flycatcher

Empidonax traillii

Eastern Phoebe

Sayornis phoebe

Great Crested Flycatcher

Myiarchus crinitus

Eastern Kingbird

Tyrannus tyrannus

Warbling Vireo

Vireo gilvus

Red-eyed Vireo

Vireo olivaceus

American Crow

Corvus brachyrhynchos

Common Raven

Corvus corax

Purple Martin

Progne subis

Tree Swallow

Tachycineta bicolor

Bank Swallow

Riparia riparia

Barn Swallow

Hirundo rustica

White-breasted Nuthatch

Sitta carolinensis

Eastern Bluebird

Sialia sialis

American Robin

Turdus migratorius

Gray Catbird

Dumetella carolinensis

Brown Thrasher

Toxostoma rufum

European Starling

Sturnus vulgaris

Cedar Waxwing

Bombycilla cedrorum

Common Yellowthroat

Geothlypis trichas

Yellow Warbler

Setophaga petechia

Chipping Sparrow

Spizella passerina

Savannah Sparrow

Passerculus sandwichensis

Song Sparrow

Melospiza melodia

Swamp Sparrow

Melospiza georgiana

Northern Cardinal

Cardinalis cardinalis

Rose-breasted Grosbeak

Pheucticus ludovicianus

Bobolink

Dolichonyx oryzivorus

Red-winged Blackbird

Agelaius phoeniceus

Eastern Meadowlark

Sturnella magna

Common Grackle

Quiscalus quiscula

American Goldfinch

Spinus tristis

House Sparrow

Passer domesticus

Thursday June 14:

It was a glorious morning with full sunshine and heat. With the heat came the stillness. Although many animals took cover from the direct sun, we had waterfowl galore at Alfred Lagoons. Some of the species we observed included as Gadwall, American Widgeon, Redhead, Ruddy Duck, American Coot, Common Gallinule, Blue & Green-winged Teals, Virginia Rail and Pied-billed Grebe. Along the periphery of the lagoon, we heard two Soras.

After the lagoons we ventured out to the Alfred Bog where a very eager Vesper Sparrow greeted us near the entrance to the boardwalk. Unfortunately, very few creatures came out into the open and the orchids had passed their prime. In the woodlot at the entrance, we had a cooperative Chestnut-sided Warbler and a White-throated sparrow. In the nearby grassy fields, we had plenty of Bobolinks and a pair of Northern Harriers in courtship.

We ended this awesome day with 55 species.

Canada Goose

Branta canadensis

Wood Duck

Aix sponsa

Gadwall

Anas strepera

American Wigeon

Anas americana

Mallard

Anas platyrhynchos

Blue-winged Teal

Anas discors

Northern Shoveler

Anas clypeata

Green-winged Teal

Anas crecca

Redhead

Aythya americana

Ruddy Duck

Oxyura jamaicensis

Wild Turkey

Meleagris gallopavo

Pied-billed Grebe

Podilymbus podiceps

Double-crested Cormorant

Phalacrocorax auritus

Great Blue Heron

Ardea herodias

Turkey Vulture

Cathartes aura

Northern Harrier

Circus cyaneus

Broad-winged Hawk

Buteo platypterus

Virginia Rail

Rallus limicola

Sora

Porzana carolina

Common Gallinule

Gallinula galeata

American Coot

Fulica americana

Killdeer

Charadrius vociferus

Spotted Sandpiper

Actitis macularius

Wilson’s Snipe

Gallinago delicata

Ring-billed Gull

Larus delawarensis

Rock Pigeon

Columba livia

Mourning Dove

Zenaida macroura

Belted Kingfisher

Megaceryle alcyon

Hairy Woodpecker

Picoides villosus

Eastern Kingbird

Tyrannus tyrannus

Warbling Vireo

Vireo gilvus

American Crow

Corvus brachyrhynchos

Common Raven

Corvus corax

Tree Swallow

Tachycineta bicolor

Bank Swallow

Riparia riparia

Barn Swallow

Hirundo rustica

Black-capped Chickadee

Poecile atricapillus

Marsh Wren

Cistothorus palustris

American Robin

Turdus migratorius

European Starling

Sturnus vulgaris

Cedar Waxwing

Bombycilla cedrorum

Ovenbird

Seiurus aurocapilla

Common Yellowthroat

Geothlypis trichas

Yellow Warbler

Setophaga petechia

Chestnut-sided Warbler

Setophaga pensylvanica

Chipping Sparrow

Spizella passerina

Vesper Sparrow

Pooecetes gramineus

Savannah Sparrow

Passerculus sandwichensis

Song Sparrow

Melospiza melodia

White-throated Sparrow

Zonotrichia albicollis

Bobolink

Dolichonyx oryzivorus

Red-winged Blackbird

Agelaius phoeniceus

Common Grackle

Quiscalus quiscula

American Goldfinch

Spinus tristis

House Sparrow

Passer domesticus

Magnolia Warbler

Scarlet Tanager

Red Squirrel

Saturday June 16:

The weather was calm and the skies dark when we first met at Stony Swamp for our PHOTO day. But, as the morning progressed, our photo conditions improved.

Photography can be quite challenging inside a forest, so we practiced ISO, shutter and aperture settings. It helped with cooperative wildlife such as a Scarlet Tanager, Black-throated Green Warbler, Wild Turkey and several Eastern Chipmunks and Red Squirrels. We also tried to be a little creative with flowers, insects, scenery, and even people.

Although our focus today was photography, we managed to spot 40 different species of birds.

Wood Duck

Aix sponsa

Mallard

Anas platyrhynchos

Hooded Merganser

Lophodytes cucullatus

Wild Turkey

Meleagris gallopavo

Osprey

Pandion haliaetus

Ring-billed Gull

Larus delawarensis

Rock Pigeon

Columba livia

Mourning Dove

Zenaida macroura

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

Sphyrapicus varius

Downy Woodpecker

Picoides pubescens

Eastern Wood-Pewee

Contopus virens

Alder Flycatcher

Empidonax alnorum

Great Crested Flycatcher

Myiarchus crinitus

Eastern Kingbird

Tyrannus tyrannus

Warbling Vireo

Vireo gilvus

Red-eyed Vireo

Vireo olivaceus

Blue Jay

Cyanocitta cristata

American Crow

Corvus brachyrhynchos

Tree Swallow

Tachycineta bicolor

Barn Swallow

Hirundo rustica

Black-capped Chickadee

Poecile atricapillus

Red-breasted Nuthatch

Sitta canadensis

White-breasted Nuthatch

Sitta carolinensis

American Robin

Turdus migratorius

European Starling

Sturnus vulgaris

Cedar Waxwing

Bombycilla cedrorum

Ovenbird

Seiurus aurocapilla

Common Yellowthroat

Geothlypis trichas

Black-thr. Green Warbler

Setophaga virens

Chipping Sparrow

Spizella passerina

Song Sparrow

Melospiza melodia

Swamp Sparrow

Melospiza georgiana

White-throated Sparrow

Zonotrichia albicollis

Northern Cardinal

Cardinalis cardinalis

Rose-breasted Grosbeak

Pheucticus ludovicianus

Red-winged Blackbird

Agelaius phoeniceus

Common Grackle

Quiscalus quiscula

Baltimore Oriole

Icterus galbula

American Goldfinch

Spinus tristis

House Sparrow

Passer domesticus

Great-crested Flycatcher

Upland Sandpiper

Bull Frog

Sunday June 17:

Our itinerary for the day changed when we discovered that the Gatineau Parkway was closed until 11am. So, instead we decided to head out along the Gatineau Escarpment. But first, we explored the immediate area around the meeting place. Much to our delight, we found a Cedar Waxing pair making a nest. On the way to the Gatineau Escarpment, we stopped at Breckenridge. In the grassy fields we could hear Upland Sandpiper. We were lucky to see at least 5 different individuals flying around.

Then we continued to Luskville where both warblers and insects were many. We had great views of Veery, Indigo Bunting, Blackburnian, Black-throated Green, Black & White, and Magnolia Warblers. Flying over the creek, we enjoyed several beautiful damselflies known as Ebony Jewelwings.

After a little pit stop, we went for a short hike inside the park. Here we had great views of Magnolia, Blackburnian and Black-throated Blue Warblers. We ended with a day-list of 58 species on this wonderful Father’s Day.

Canada Goose

Branta canadensis

Mallard

Anas platyrhynchos

Double-crested Cormorant

Phalacrocorax auritus

Great Blue Heron

Ardea herodias

Turkey Vulture

Cathartes aura

Osprey

Pandion haliaetus

Red-shouldered Hawk

Buteo lineatus

Upland Sandpiper

Bartramia longicauda

Ring-billed Gull

Larus delawarensis

Rock Pigeon

Columba livia

Mourning Dove

Zenaida macroura

Ruby-thr. Hummingbird

Archilochus colubris

Belted Kingfisher

Megaceryle alcyon

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

Sphyrapicus varius

Northern Flicker

Colaptes auratus

Eastern Wood-Pewee

Contopus virens

Alder Flycatcher

Empidonax alnorum

Eastern Phoebe

Sayornis phoebe

Great Crested Flycatcher

Myiarchus crinitus

Eastern Kingbird

Tyrannus tyrannus

Red-eyed Vireo

Vireo olivaceus

Blue Jay

Cyanocitta cristata

American Crow

Corvus brachyrhynchos

Common Raven

Corvus corax

Tree Swallow

Tachycineta bicolor

Barn Swallow

Hirundo rustica

Cliff Swallow

Petrochelidon pyrrhonota

Black-capped Chickadee

Poecile atricapillus

Red-breasted Nuthatch

Sitta canadensis

White-breasted Nuthatch

Sitta carolinensis

Eastern Bluebird

Sialia sialis

Veery

Catharus fuscescens

American Robin

Turdus migratorius

Gray Catbird

Dumetella carolinensis

European Starling

Sturnus vulgaris

Cedar Waxwing

Bombycilla cedrorum

Ovenbird

Seiurus aurocapilla

Black-and-white Warbler

Mniotilta varia

Common Yellowthroat

Geothlypis trichas

American Redstart

Setophaga ruticilla

Magnolia Warbler

Setophaga magnolia

Blackburnian Warbler

Setophaga fusca

Yellow Warbler

Setophaga petechia

Chestnut-sided Warbler

Setophaga pensylvanica

Black-thr. Blue Warbler

Setophaga caerulescens

Black-thr. Green Warbler

Setophaga virens

Chipping Sparrow

Spizella passerina

Savannah Sparrow

Passerculus sandwichensis

Song Sparrow

Melospiza melodia

Swamp Sparrow

Melospiza georgiana

White-throated Sparrow

Zonotrichia albicollis

Northern Cardinal

Cardinalis cardinalis

Indigo Bunting

Passerina cyanea

Red-winged Blackbird

Agelaius phoeniceus

Eastern Meadowlark

Sturnella magna

Common Grackle

Quiscalus quiscula

American Goldfinch

Spinus tristis

Black-crowned Night-Heron

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“Always an Adventure with Tony and Nina”

Nina Stavlund

Nina Stavlund

Professional Photographer accepting new assignments!
After working as an Executive/Personal Assistant for 15 years, mainly in the oil and gas business in Norway, I needed a change in my life. Since photography had been a passion since I was a child, I wanted to do something creative and meaningful in this field. This inspired me to visit Greece for 3 wonderful years. After returning to Norway, I decided it was time to become a professional photographer/artist. In 2010, I graduated from “Bilder Nordic School of Photography” in Oslo. At the same time, I was working full time with the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) International Arctic Program.
In addition to nature & wildlife photography, I also do lifestyle, weddings/anniversaries, portrait and creative photography and I teach photography and photo editing.

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Dermot McCabe

None of these placenames were part of my geography course. I believe from the birdlist, it’s a North American report. Any chance of a location? 🙂
Dermot. 

Nina Stavlund

Hi there, yes, all these reports are from the greater Ottawa area, Ontario, Canada.

Dermot Mccabe

Thanks, Nina, My first ever visit to Canada was June ’11. Your list takes me back to Quebec and two weeks great birding.
Regards,
Dermot.

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