Mar 172014
 


The Whooping Crane is named for its call, which can be heard over great distances thanks to the bird’s extra-long trachea, which coils around its breastbone twice like a French horn. Like other cranes, the Whooper is noisy; the word “crane” comes from the Anglo-Saxon “cran,” which means “to cry out.”

Whooping Cranes by Brian Small

The tallest flying bird in North America, Whooping Cranes measure up to five feet tall with a seven- to eight-foot wingspan. The species also has another distinction: It is the rarest crane in the world. Several decades ago, it almost disappeared forever due to habitat loss and hunting.

Whooping Crane by Brian Small

Still extremely rare, Whooping Cranes are on the WatchList and protected as an endangered species. Sadly, up to one-quarter of all Whoopers are shot and killed. (Participate in our action alert to bring the shooters to justice.)

Whooping Cranes are monogamous and mate for life. Pairs perform an elaborate dance display during courtship, with leaps, wing flaps, head tosses, and flinging of light objects such as feathers and grass.

The last wild flock of Whoopers numbered fewer than 20 birds in the 1940s. Fortunately, conservation efforts and international cooperation between Canada and the United States reversed what looked like a sure extinction.

Loss or deterioration of critical wetland habitat (including reduced fresh water at wintering grounds in Texas) remains one of the biggest threats facing wild Whooping Cranes. This limited amount of habitat leaves the birds vulnerable to catastrophic weather events or oil spills. Collisions with power lines and wind turbines are an ongoing threat.

And again, Illegal shooting, most recently in Kentucky and Louisiana, still occurs. In the past five years, at least 16 Whooping Cranes have been shot, and most court sentences have been an insufficient deterrent.

This article was first published by American Bird Conservancy.

Share this post with your friends





Facebook Comments

Leave a Reply

avatar
LoveYourDNA

People who shoot these animals as well as research animals as was done on purpose to a research bear in the Ely, MN are psychopathic and until we can start fixing people’s corrupt/haywire DNA, we will always be battling this. Don’t give up the fight, however!

Okapi61

It can be important to know the name of illegal shooters, can somebody make that ?

wpDiscuz

Top-Viewed Posts Last 30 Days

  1. POLL: Should Trump’s elephant trophy hunting plan be stopped? – [1179 Views]
  2. POLL: Should babies be allowed to buy hunting licenses? – [1029 Views]
  3. POLL: Should big-game and canned, trophy hunting be banned? – [1017 Views]
  4. POLL: Should wild horses be protected from roundups and slaughter? – [891 Views]
  5. POLL: Should South Africa strictly enforce its anti-poaching legislation? – [815 Views]
  6. Florida Opened a Fake Alligator Farm to Catch Poachers – [806 Views]
  7. POLL: Should African Grey Parrots be protected from illegal trafficking? – [786 Views]
  8. POLL: Should gillnets be banned in the Upper Gulf to save the Vaquita? – [778 Views]
  9. POLL: Should the use of animals in circuses be banned? – [755 Views]
  10. POLL: Should international shipping of shark fins be banned? – [752 Views]

Top-Viewed Posts Last 12 Months

  1. POLL: Should hunting with hounds be banned? – [7663 Views]
  2. Gray Squirrels versus Red Squirrels – The Facts [5866 Views]
  3. POLL: Should the trophy hunting of bears and wolves be banned? – [3818 Views]
  4. POLL: Should foxes be culled to protect domestic pets? [3799 Views]
  5. POLL: Should there be a worldwide ban on fur farming? – [3648 Views]
  6. POLL: Should the slaughter of badgers in the UK be finally stopped? – [3065 Views]
  7. POLL: Should the cruel sport of bullfighting be banned? [2873 Views]
  8. POLL: Should Canada ban the hunting of seals? [2667 Views]
  9. POLL: Should the Tories be allowed to bring back fox hunting? [2578 Views]
  10. POLL: Should wild elephants be sold to Chinese zoos? [2322 Views]