Alaska – 12th June (Day 16)

Alaska – 12th June (Day 16)



The morning started rather foggy and dreary, a big change from the amazingly warm weather we had been experiencing (up to 21c yesterday) and much more akin to the weather we were expecting. However, fairly quickly the fog cleared and the morning morning was gloriously sunny although rain set-in in the afternoon.

We spent the morning on the Gas Pipeline Road and Cakeater Road, one of the first birds was a stunning almost all white male Snowy Owl. A 1st winter Thayer’s Gull flew overhead and we enjoyed the waders around the lagoon here including some stunning Western Sandpiper, one of which had a ridiculous number of rings plus a leg-flag, the flag was causing the bird to trip as it fed.

I don’t understand the mentality of fitting so many rings to a bird.

Alaska – 12th June (Day 16)

Snowy Owl (male) – Cakeeater Road, Barrow

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Thayer’s Gull (1st winter) – Cakeeater Road, Barrow

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Thayer’s Gull (1st winter) – Cakeeater Road, Barrow

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Western Sandpiper – Cakeeater Road, Barrow

The next inlet produced a stunning summer plumaged Red-necked Stint showing at close range and displaying to a Western Sandpiper. Also here were Red-breasted Merganser, Greater White-fronted Goose, Dunlin,American Golden Plover and Long-billed Dowitcher.

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Red-necked Stint – Cakeeater Road, Barrow

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Red-necked Stint – Cakeeater Road, Barrow

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Red-necked Stint – Cakeeater Road, Barrow

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Red-necked Stint – Cakeeater Road, Barrow

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Red-necked Stint – Cakeeater Road, Barrow

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Red-necked Stint – Cakeeater Road, Barrow

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Red-necked Stint – Cakeeater Road, Barrow

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Red-necked Stint – Cakeeater Road, Barrow

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Western Sandpiper – Cakeeater Road, Barrow

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Western Sandpiper – Cakeeater Road, Barrow

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Western Sandpiper – Cakeeater Road, Barrow

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Long-billed Dowitcher – Cakeeater Road, Barrow

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Long-billed Dowitcher – Cakeeater Road, Barrow

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Long-billed Dowitcher – Cakeeater Road, Barrow

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Greater White-fronted Goose (gambelli) – Cakeeater Road, Barrow

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American Golden Plover – Cakeeater Road, Barrow

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Dunlin of race articola – Cakeeater Road, Barrow

Further along Gas Pipe Road a stunning pair of Spectacled Eider showed well close to the road and we spent some time enjoying these birds. Absolutely stunning in the morning sunshine.

Further on towards the end of the road we enjoyed views of Grey Phalarope, Red-necked Phalarope, Tundra Swan and Pacific Diver.

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Spectacled Eider – Gas Pipe Road, Barrow

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Spectacled Eider – Gas Pipe Road, Barrow

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Spectacled Eider – Gas Pipe Road, Barrow

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Spectacled Eider – Gas Pipe Road, Barrow

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Spectacled Eider – Gas Pipe Road, Barrow

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Spectacled Eider (female) – Gas Pipe Road, Barrow

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Spectacled Eider – Gas Pipe Road, Barrow

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Spectacled Eider (female) – Gas Pipe Road, Barrow

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Spectacled Eider – Gas Pipe Road, Barrow

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Spectacled Eider – Gas Pipe Road, Barrow

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Spectacled Eider – Gas Pipe Road, Barrow

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Spectacled Eider – Gas Pipe Road, Barrow

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Red-necked Phalarope – Gas Pipe Road, Barrow

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Red-necked Phalarope – Gas Pipe Road, Barrow

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Red-necked Phalarope – Gas Pipe Road, Barrow

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Red-necked Phalarope – Gas Pipe Road, Barrow

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Red-necked Phalarope – Gas Pipe Road, Barrow

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Grey Phalarope (male) – Gas Pipe Road, Barrow

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Grey Phalarope (female) – Gas Pipe Road, Barrow

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Grey Phalarope (female) – Gas Pipe Road, Barrow

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American Golden Plover – Gas Pipe Road, Barrow

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American Golden Plover – Gas Pipe Road, Barrow

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Snow Bunting – Gas Pipe Road, Barrow

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Snow Bunting – Gas Pipe Road, Barrow

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Snow Bunting (female) – Gas Pipe Road, Barrow

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Snow Bunting – Gas Pipe Road, Barrow

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Tundra Swan – Gas Pipe Road, Barrow

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Red-necked Phalarope – Gas Pipe Road, Barrow

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Red-necked Phalarope (male to left) – Gas Pipe Road, Barrow

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Red-necked Phalarope (male) – Gas Pipe Road, Barrow

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Pectoral Sanpiper – Gas Pipe Road, Barrow

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Pintail – Gas Pipe Road, Barrow

After dinner we spent the early evening on Barrow Point where three Polar Bear were still present but not showing as well as previous days, in fact they were mainly asleep.

We spent some time messing around on the beach and on the shores of the frozen sea before heading for bed a little earlier than usual due to the rain.

 

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Simon Colenutt

Simon Colenutt

I began birdwatching at the age of nine when living on the Isle of Wight. After obtaining a copy of the Isle of Wight Bird Report from 1976 I realised that Manx Shearwater, Arctic Skua, Pomarine Skua and Black Tern were regularly seen at St.Catherine's Point, only five miles from my home village of Chale Green. To a nine year old these birds were near mythical and so I just had to go and try to see them. Little did I know that these birds were seasonal and after a long winter of seeing nothing I eventually started to bump into other birdwatchers as March drew to a close. It was then that Dave Hunnybun, Dave Wooldridge, Paul Castle, Peter Gandy and Audrey Wilkinson introduced me to the art of seawatching and the joys of bird migration, I have not looked back since.

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Simon Colenutt

Simon Colenutt

I began birdwatching at the age of nine when living on the Isle of Wight. After obtaining a copy of the Isle of Wight Bird Report from 1976 I realised that Manx Shearwater, Arctic Skua, Pomarine Skua and Black Tern were regularly seen at St.Catherine's Point, only five miles from my home village of Chale Green. To a nine year old these birds were near mythical and so I just had to go and try to see them. Little did I know that these birds were seasonal and after a long winter of seeing nothing I eventually started to bump into other birdwatchers as March drew to a close. It was then that Dave Hunnybun, Dave Wooldridge, Paul Castle, Peter Gandy and Audrey Wilkinson introduced me to the art of seawatching and the joys of bird migration, I have not looked back since.

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