Dingo bites French sunbather down under just weeks after wild beast grabs boy

Dingo bites French sunbather down under just weeks after wild beast grabs boy



The moment a cheeky dingo bit a French tourist on the bottom has been caught on film. The wild beast’s cheeky nip on the bum comes after a dingo attempted to drag a boy under the water at K’gari island, Australia.

Officials on the island, formerly called Fraser Island, have warned visitors to beware of dingoes which they say are becoming less wary of humans.

The woman was bitten on the bum as she sunbathed on the beach in April, though the video footage only recently surfaced.

Last week a boy, 10, was walking along the island’s west coast seafront when a dingo grabbed him and tried to pull him into the water.

His 12-year-old sister managed to free him from the dingo’s jaws, but he suffered puncture wounds to his arms and shoulders.

A screenshot from a video of a woman being bitten by a dingo (Image: Department of Environment and Science)
A screenshot from a video of a woman being bitten by a dingo (Image: Department of Environment and Science)
A screenshot of the dingo approaching the woman before striking (Image: Department of Environment and Science)
A screenshot of the dingo approaching the woman before striking (Image: Department of Environment and Science)

Danielle Mansfield, K’gari Assistant Principal Ranger, warned tourists were failing to supervise their children and said adults needed to be aware of their whereabouts at all times.

She said: “On K’gari, this means children and teenagers must be within arm’s reach of an adult at all times, even if you can’t see any dingoes in the area.”

The dingo that bit the woman on the bum was put down as the authorities on the island believed it was behind a series of attacks on other tourists, including a seven-year-old boy and a 42-year-old woman.

Rangers said there have been several times when visitors needed help as they were stalked or growled at by the wild beasts.

A wild dingo by the sea (Image: Getty)
A wild dingo by the sea (Image: Getty)

Ms Mansfield said: “We have increased patrols in the region to monitor the wongaris [dingo] behaviour and pass on dingo-safe messaging to campers and visitors.

“These animals are capable of inflicting serious harm, and they have bitten children and adults, and some are quite brazen and are not fleeing when yelled at or when someone brandishes a stick.

“People think it won’t happen to them, but it can happen to anyone and that’s why rangers are providing dingo-safe information to as many people as possible.”
Officials say visitors feeding the dingoes has fuelled the clash between the beasts and humans.

This article by Jon King was first published by The Express on 22 June 2023. Lead Image: A wild dingo (Image: Getty).


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