First video footage of 2 EDGE amphibians in the Western Ghats, India!

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The Zoological Society of London’s “EDGE (Evolutionary Distinct and Globally Endangered) of Existence programme is the only global conservation initiative to focus specifically on threatened species that represent a significant amount of unique evolutionary history”

Mammals, Amphibians and Coral Reefs on a global scale have been prioritized in this manner. Of the Top 100 EDGE Amphibians, 4 are currently found in the portion of the -Sri Lanka biodiversity hotspot. Following is what we believe is the first video footage of 2 such EDGE amphibians in the : The Toad-skinned Frog and the Black Microhylid Frog

The first footage is that of the “Critically Endangered” Toad-skinned Frogwhich belongs to the Indirana Genus, found only in . The frog is exceptionally different from the other Indiranas.

It’s wartiness and skin folds have a stark resemblance to a toad and more so it’s behavior. Unlike the other Indiranas, this frog seemed to depend more on its ability to camouflage, rather than speed to escape disturbance. The under-body was extremely distinct; grainy black in color, with very little webbing between its toes.

Toad-skinned Frog – Black Microhylid Frog

The second EDGE species is what I would refer to as a “Gollum” among the I have seen. The closest relatives of this Black Microhylid Frogare found in Tanzania! The frog is stark black in color with numerous raised projections all over.

The tip of each of these projections is blue giving the animal an overall shimmering look. And it was only when the animal moved or was flipped over, were its bright orange colored portions revealed!

Black Microhylid Frog

Read the entire article at the official ZSL EDGE Blog

Arun Kanagavel

Arun Kanagavel

My interests are based on the human dimensions of wildlife. In particular I am interested in understanding the knowledge that local communities possess and accumulate over their life-time, their conflict with biodiversity and initiatives through which local communities (provided they are interested) can be integrated into the field of conservation, rather than “laying them out”. I am also interested in building inventories of biodiversity (reptiles, amphibians, avifauna and medium-sized mammals) in poorly explored areas, and improving the profile of lesser- known or liked species.

Arun Kanagavel

Arun Kanagavel

My interests are based on the human dimensions of wildlife. In particular I am interested in understanding the knowledge that local communities possess and accumulate over their life-time, their conflict with biodiversity and initiatives through which local communities (provided they are interested) can be integrated into the field of conservation, rather than “laying them out”. I am also interested in building inventories of biodiversity (reptiles, amphibians, avifauna and medium-sized mammals) in poorly explored areas, and improving the profile of lesser- known or liked species.

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Kalai Mani

Hi arun, nice video