Oslo Iceland

Oslo Iceland



I needed a good day to lift me out of the doldrums currently being caused by a severe case of Trump Fatigue Syndrome and I got it – thank you bird gods! The day started with the Sørkedalen Hawk Owl before 9am. This bird has been seen very occasionally over the last two months (although not by me) and is clearly using a large area in its search for food. It was reported at dusk yesterday though and I figured that it might still be in the same area early this morning and thankfully it was.

Sat on top of the same tall spruce as where I’d seen it on 30 Nov the light was pants but I decided to stick with it in case it hunted. It did indeed hunt unseen by me whilst I was watching a couple of Goldcrests and it took me a while to find the bird again when it eventually flew up from the ground to the top of the spruce. I don’t know whether it caught anything but 10 minutes later if flew down again but pulled up at the last minute and perched low down in a tree.

I hastily made my round to where it was and then watched it plunge down to the ground amongst the trees. It clearly had caught something and flew up onto a low stump where it then proceeded to drop its prey and then flew off without making any attempt to recover it. I went over and found a Common Shrew (krattspissmus) on the ground. It was amongst some branches and may well have been difficult for the owl to recover although it seems such a rookie mistake to drop breakfast (the shrew was well and truly dead) that I believe the owl simply discarded the shrew. Why, I don’t know but it was a tiny creature and maybe they don’t taste so good?

I picked up the shrew and threw it out a few times but without gaining any interest from the owl which then got mobbed by a couple of crows and moved to an even higher spruce. I figured that I needed to be able to move the shrew around if I was going to be able it to use to attract the owl but had no string with me. I drove to nearest shop and they had no string but did have dental floss! On my return though I couldn’t find the owl but do now have a shrew in the freezer for use another time and no excuse not to floss. After this Fornebu was deadly quiet although a flock of 60 Siskin was maybe a sign that this species is on the move as it has been an incredibly scarce species so far this winter.

I checked out the dump again for gulls without finding anything interesting in the few minutes I had with them before something unseen sent they all up in the air. I then retired home and was enjoying some cheddar cheese when I had a text asking me to confirm the identity of an Iceland Gull at Østensjøvannet. Anne Kari Norland had struck gold again! 20 minutes later and I was enjoying this bird too. It sat on the ice looking very at home and joined the local Herring Gulls in scrapping for bread.

The pattern on one of the coverts on the left wing shows this to be the same bird that I have missed in Østfold and Akershus so third time lucky! It was also a large bird being the same size as many of the Herring Gulls so is therefore likely to be a male. Iceland and Glaucous Gulls on successive days in Oslo plus Hawk Owl is definitely what I needed although the optical stabiliser on the bazooka giving it up the ghost did take some of the shine off the day. Bring it on Grumpy Trump!

iceland%2Bgull%2BIMG 9909%2Bcopy
2nd winter Iceland Gull (grønlandsmåke) Østensjøvannet Oslo

iceland%2Bgull%2BIMG 9932%2Bcopy

iceland%2Bgull%2BIMG 9827%2Bcopy

iceland%2Bgull%2BIMG 9888%2Bcopy
here it is having a drink to try to help some bread go down

iceland%2Bgull%2BIMG 9894%2Bcopy

iceland%2Bgull%2BIMG 9903%2Bcopy
I bet there are sweaty palms out there as the bling givers are planning how the Iceland Gull will suffer the fate of the poor Herring Gull
iceland%2Bgull%2BIMG 9868%2Bcopy
all the gulls flew off at one stage but not because of a raptor but because someone had dumped a load of bread by the car park. I had completely the wrong settings on the camera to capture action

iceland%2Bgull%2BIMG 9872%2Bcopy

iceland%2Bgull%2BIMG 9878%2Bcopy
here it is flying back with its crop full of bread
iceland%2Bgull%2BIMG 9921%2Bcopy
It had obviously swallowed a very large amount and seemed to have problems swallowing it properly
iceland%2Bgull%2Bcomparison%2BIMG 9825%2Bcopy
here a comparison of todays bird with the Langvannet bird 28.01 (photo: Geir Høen) and the Askim bird from 13.01 (photo: Morten Olsen). Note the distinctive pattern on one of the covert feathers
hawk%2Bowl%2BIMG 9707%2Bcopy
Hawk Owl in Sørkedalen

hawk%2Bowl%2BIMG 9720%2Bcopy

hawk%2Bowl%2BIMG 9735%2Bcopy
Rodent spotted! but of course the camera was not set for any sort of action
hawk%2Bowl%2BIMG 9738%2Bcopy
here you can just make out the bird hovering
hawk%2Bowl%2BIMG 9747%2Bcopy
before it gave up and sat low down in a tree
hawk%2Bowl%2BIMG 9753%2Bcopy
I was able to go round to the other side of the tree and watch it at head height (a novelty for Hawkie)
hawk%2Bowl%2BIMG 9754%2Bcopy
here it has sighted something
hawk%2Bowl%2BIMG 9755%2Bcopy
and plunge
hawk%2Bowl%2BIMG 9756%2Bcopy
on top of the shrew
hawk%2Bowl%2BIMG 9775%2Bcopy
this is where it flew with the shrew and dropped it
hawk%2Bowl%2BIMG 9788%2Bcopy
being mobbed by a Crow
common%2Bshrew%2BIMG 5504%2Bcopy
The unwanted Common Shrew (krattspissmus)

common%2Bshrew%2BIMG 5505%2Bcopy

pintail%2BIMG 9854%2Bcopy
The wintering female Pintail (stjertand) at Østensjøvannet back for its second winter

pintail%2BIMG 9856%2Bcopy

great%2Bgrey%2Bshrike%2BIMG 9807%2Bcopy
one of the Maridalen Great Grey Shrikes (varser)

 

Subscribe to our FREE Newsletter

 

 

Simon Rix

Simon Rix

Simon Rix is an English Birder who has lived in Oslo, Norway since 2001. Birding has been his passion since primary school and after an education as an economist and career within oil and gas and then drinks industry he turned his attention full time to birds as middle age approached. He is particularly interested in patch birding and migration and is an active guide, blogger and photographer. He is a member of the Norwegian Rarities Committee (NSKF).

close
Vanished - Megascops Choliba by Jose Garcia Allievi

Discover hidden wildlife with our FREE newsletters

We don’t spam! Read our privacy policy for more info.

Simon Rix

Simon Rix

Simon Rix is an English Birder who has lived in Oslo, Norway since 2001. Birding has been his passion since primary school and after an education as an economist and career within oil and gas and then drinks industry he turned his attention full time to birds as middle age approached. He is particularly interested in patch birding and migration and is an active guide, blogger and photographer. He is a member of the Norwegian Rarities Committee (NSKF).

Share this post with your friends




Facebook Comments

Leave a Reply

guest
0 Comments