Pusha The Cat Adopts Orphaned Baby Squirrels With The Help Of Her Human Friends

Pusha The Cat Adopts Orphaned Baby Squirrels With The Help Of Her Human Friends



Oftentimes when baby squirrels get adopted, it’s by humans.

We’ve covered so many stories about it like how this soldier found a baby squirrel and nursed it back to health, or this woman who tried to foster one but ended up with a roommate instead, or the story of how a couple went on a date and one of them came home suddenly a pet parent.

These are all wholesome stories, sure, but how can they become doubly cute? Add a cat and her kittens.

Cats usually chase off squirrels, but that’s not the case for Pusha the cat.

Pusha herself just gave birth to her own kittens at a local park where she actually lives in. She has her human friends visit her sometimes and the park keepers also know and care for her when needed.

But this time, it wasn’t Pusha that didn’t help. The humans in the park found a bunch of orphaned squirrels and they decided to introduce them to Pusha, probably in hopes that Pusha help and nurture the tiny babies.

PHOTO: YOUTUBE/INSIDE EDITION
PHOTO: YOUTUBE/INSIDE EDITION

The baby squirrels were afraid of Pusha at first, but their human friends didn’t give up and continued to urge them to interact until both got used to being near each other eventually. Pusha nourishes and grooms the baby squirrels along with her own kittens and the humans and park keepers help supplement the squirrels with bottles of milk.

They’re an odd family but the way they interact is truly adorable.

In the video below, you could see the little squirrels playing with their cat mom and they’re so comfortable with her that they are able to sleep cuddled up with Pusha. And it doesn’t look like the kittens are jealous of the squirrels since it’s been reported that they were able to spot the little ones playing around with each other at the park.

As Inside Edition said, “The unconventional family is a reminder that a mother’s love knows no bounds, even across species.”

This article by Louise Peralta was first published by The Animal Rescue Site. Lead Image: PHOTO: UNSPLASH/ALEXAS_FOTOS.


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