Speyside

Mrs D and I have just returned home from a week in the Scottish highlands joining up with son Dan and his good wife Mary and their two young children Martha and Theo. We were based in Nethybridge which is in easy reach of all the wildlife hotspots. Although more of a family holiday I […]

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An Eagle Helps Preserve L.A. Land for a Wildlife Corridor

There are 17 acres of open land in the Hollywood Hills that provide a crucial corridor for wildlife like mountain lions, bobcats and deer. But, as I wrote in October 2015, that land was in danger of being subdivided into a housing development with four mansions, destroying the corridor. This would be devastating for local […]

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Advocates Raise Millions for Wildlife Bridge in Los Angeles

It’s not an easy life for the mountain lions and other animals that make their home in the Santa Monica Mountains. Because they’re so isolated, Los Angeles mountain lions are almost 100 percent likely to become extinct in 50 years due to inbreeding, which can cause health problems and unusual behavior. Leaving their territory is […]

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A quiet day in Tadoba National Park

As the late morning sun got hotter, the Tigress mom, Choti Tara led her cubs into the shaded undergrowth farther away from us and soon disappeared. As we prepared to move to a different area of the Tadoba National Park, this handsome Spotted Deer Stag emerged from the lantana and we framed him when he […]

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Upscale Neighborhood Outraged by Resident’s Shooting of Doe and Fawn

Very early one morning earlier this month, in the affluent town of Tiburon in Northern California, a doe and her young fawn grazed on some newly planted landscaping in the yard of resident Mark Dickinson. The two deer had been there before. To protect his new plantings, did Dickinson install a fence or try using […]

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Use of mammals still prevalent in Brazil’s Conservation Units

For as long as humans and animals have co-existed, people have utilized them as resources. Animals, and their parts, have been used for a variety of purposes, ranging from basic food to more esoteric practices such as in magical ceremonies or religion. A new study published in mongabay.com‘s open-access journal Tropical Conservation Science has found […]

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When forests aren’t really forests: the high cost of Chile’s tree plantations

At first glance, the statistics tell a hopeful story: Chile’s forests are expanding. According to Global Forest Watch, overall forest cover changes show approximately 300,000 hectares were gained between 2000 and 2013 in Chile’s central and southern regions. Specifically, 1.4 million hectares of forest cover were gained, while about 1.1 million hectares were lost. On […]

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Plea for the Pyrenean stags

The largest and best reproductive males are systematically culled for their trophies even during the bellowing period. Result: these males are not seen any more and the younger ones hesitate to come down in the Pyrenean valleys to join the females; this is what’s left to admire… A sad situation. As the wild boar, this […]

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Scientists: to save the Malayan tiger, save its prey

A major premise of biology, as any high-schooler can tell you, is the study of the connections between organisms. Perhaps nowhere is there a better example of this than in Malaysia, where the population of Endangered Malayan tigers (Panthera tigris jacksoni) is being undercut by dwindling prey. A recent study by MYCAT, the Malaysian Conservation […]

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Scientists map human-wildlife conflict in India

Designating protected areas in a country with 1.27 billion people comes with its own consequences: around each protected area in India lies a zone where wildlife strays out, and people stray in. Inevitably, there is contact, and more often than not, conflict. Human wildlife conflict has been under the lens for a long time. How […]

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