Thousands of whale images are being combed through by researchers in order to help conserve a calving spot off the coast of Western Australia

Thousands of whale images are being combed through by researchers in order to help conserve a calving spot off the coast of Western Australia



Thousands of whale images are being combed through by researchers in order to help conserve a calving spot off the coast of Western Australia that was severely affected by the whaling industry.

The researchers believe Geographe Bay, off the coast of south-west Western Australia, is an important calving ground that needs to be protected, and they’re using a 30-year collection of pictures to figure out how many southern right whales have visited the area over time.

Every year, southern right whales migrate from Antarctica to Australia’s coastal seas to breed and calve.

“They will calve within 500 meters or one kilometer of the coast,” said Chandra Salgado Kent, an assistant professor at Edith Cowan University and the project’s lead researcher. According to her, on average, moms bear calves every three years.

Commercial whaling destroyed the population of southern right whales in the nineteenth century. The practice was outlawed in the 1970s, and Australian numbers have increased to an estimated 3,400 individuals since then, although the species remains endangered.

Lead Image: Scientists are using 30 years’ worth of images to see how whales numbers off south-west Western Australia have changed over time. Photograph: Pia Markovic/Edith Cowan University.


What you can do

Support ‘Fighting for Wildlife’ by donating as little as $1 – It only takes a minute. Thank you.


payment

Fighting for Wildlife supports approved wildlife conservation organizations, which spend at least 80 percent of the money they raise on actual fieldwork, rather than administration and fundraising. When making a donation you can designate for which type of initiative it should be used – wildlife, oceans, forests or climate.

Article Source
close
Vanished - Megascops Choliba by Jose Garcia Allievi

Discover hidden wildlife with our FREE newsletters

Select list(s):

We don’t spam! Read our privacy policy for more info.

Supertrooper

Founder and Executive Editor

Share this post with your friends




Facebook Comments

Leave a Reply

guest

0 Comments