World’s biggest camera trapping program hits 1 million photos of tropical animals



The world’s largest study of wildlife using remote camera traps has captured one million photographs. The project, known as the (TEAM) Network, takes photos of mammals and birds in 16 protected areas across 14 tropical countries in Asia, Africa, as well as Central and South America. Remote camera traps, which take stealth photos of wildlife when no humans are around, have become an increasingly important tool in the conservationists’ toolbox, allowing researchers to monitor otherwise hard-to-find animals in remote and often punishing locations.

“The one-millionth image is an amazing representation of our camera trap work, and it symbolizes the success we have had with this program in collecting new data,” said Dr. Jorge Ahumada, TEAM’s Technical Director. “We are also at a critical point in beginning to provide information to decision makers from the local to global level on how biodiversity is affected by climate change and habitat loss.”

This () from TEAM’s Cocha Cashu site in Manu National Park, Peru stayed in front of the camera for over 90 photographs, and became the 1,000,000 photograph taken by the TEAM Network.Courtesy of the TEAM Network.

() from TEAM’s site in Nouabale Ndoki National Park, Republic of Congo. Photo courtesy of the TEAM Network.

() from TEAM’s site in Caxiuana National Forest, Brazil. Photo courtesy of the TEAM Network.

() from TEAM’s site in the Pasoh Forest Reserve, Malaysia. Photo courtesy of the TEAM Network.

() from TEAM’s Cocha Cashu site in Manu National Park, Peru. Photo courtesy of the TEAM Network.

Read full article on Mongabay.com

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