Alaska

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We were up at 05:00 and headed to Hillside Park where we birded from 06:00-09:00. This was a lovely mixed area of forest with maple, oak and pines but full of mozzies.

We birded a few miles along the various trails accessible from the car park at the eastern end of Abbott Road. Highlights here were American Three-toed Woodpecker (1), Varied Thrush (a male and female both carrying food), (1), (1), Townsend’s Warbler (3), Wilson’s Warbler (1), Yellow-rumped (Myrtle) Warbler (6), (8), Boreal Chickadee (4), and Grey Jay (2).

After a pizza breakfast in the car park we headed to the airport for a 12:15 flight to St. Paul refuelling at Dillingham and landing at 15:10 on St.Paul Island.

Varied Thrush (female) – Hillside Park, Anchorage

Varied Thrush (female) – Hillside Park, Anchorage

Boreal Chickadee (race colombianus) – Hillside Park, Anchorage

Boreal Chickadee (race colombianus) – Hillside Park, Anchorage

Black-capped Chickadee (or race turneri). Some birders speak of confusion with this species and Boreal Chickadee but these really are quite different looking birds – Hillside Park, Anchorage

Three-toed Woodpecker (of race fasciatus) – Hillside Park, Anchorage

Slate-coloured Junco (of nominate race hyemalis)- Hillside Park, Anchorage

Two-barred Crossbill (of nominate race leucoptera) – Hillside Park, Anchorage

Townsend’s Warbler – Hillside Park, Anchorage

Swindon’s Thrush – Hillside Park, Anchorage

 

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Simon Colenutt

Simon Colenutt

I began birdwatching at the age of nine when living on the Isle of Wight. After obtaining a copy of the Isle of Wight Bird Report from 1976 I realised that Manx Shearwater, Arctic Skua, Pomarine Skua and Black Tern were regularly seen at St.Catherine's Point, only five miles from my home village of Chale Green. To a nine year old these birds were near mythical and so I just had to go and try to see them. Little did I know that these birds were seasonal and after a long winter of seeing nothing I eventually started to bump into other birdwatchers as March drew to a close. It was then that Dave Hunnybun, Dave Wooldridge, Paul Castle, Peter Gandy and Audrey Wilkinson introduced me to the art of seawatching and the joys of bird migration, I have not looked back since.

Simon Colenutt

Simon Colenutt

I began birdwatching at the age of nine when living on the Isle of Wight. After obtaining a copy of the Isle of Wight Bird Report from 1976 I realised that Manx Shearwater, Arctic Skua, Pomarine Skua and Black Tern were regularly seen at St.Catherine's Point, only five miles from my home village of Chale Green. To a nine year old these birds were near mythical and so I just had to go and try to see them. Little did I know that these birds were seasonal and after a long winter of seeing nothing I eventually started to bump into other birdwatchers as March drew to a close. It was then that Dave Hunnybun, Dave Wooldridge, Paul Castle, Peter Gandy and Audrey Wilkinson introduced me to the art of seawatching and the joys of bird migration, I have not looked back since.

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Mars Greenwood

You are one lucky guy. I love bird watching and listening to them sing….too Sometimes they sing because they are just so happy,content and busy doing what they do…… Thank you so much, Simon, for sharing your story. I've always love nature….and the birds are the iceing on the cake. It's so rewarding when you can share your passion w/ others who feel the same. Cheers!