Baby Robin !



Last week I found a robin’s nest in the garden behind my home in Brooklyn.

The nest was placed under a lamp, where it was sheltered from rain, heated from the light at night, and supported on a sturdy pole. Clever!

I tiptoed out after dark and found a vigilant parent motionless on the edge of thenest, watching me. I bet she heard me coming.

This parent is removing a fecal sac that a chick produced, a little membrane-bound package of waste material that is easily carried away and discarded.

chicks grow fast. Not wanting to disturb them overly much, I returned a week after I took the photos above, and I found this giant baby.

Action shot! A parent brought food and the baby jumped up enthusiastically, looking sparsely feathered. Parent and chick in a classic pose. A few days after this photo was taken, I went to look at the nest and found it empty. Good luck, Baby Robin!

Julie Feinstein

Julie Feinstein

I am a Collection Manager at the American Museum of Natural History, an author, and a photographer. I live in New York City. I recently published my first popular science book, Field Guide to Urban Wildlife, an illustrated collection of natural history essays about common animals. I update my blog, Urban Wildlife Guide, every Sunday.

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Julie Feinstein

Julie Feinstein

I am a Collection Manager at the American Museum of Natural History, an author, and a photographer. I live in New York City. I recently published my first popular science book, Field Guide to Urban Wildlife, an illustrated collection of natural history essays about common animals. I update my blog, Urban Wildlife Guide, every Sunday.

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