Chinese Goshawk Migration (Part 1)



Late this afternoon I decided to hike up Mt Kinugasa and see if there was any migration action. I arrived at the summit at about 16:30 and stayed until 18:00. During that time I saw a lone Chinese Goshawk, but it was quite far and on the sunward side of me, so I didn’t bother to try to photograph it.

Also, a juvenile appeared not too far away and perched in a tree. It flew away but returned to one of three perches, so I managed some decent photos. A pair of Grey-streaked Flycatchers were also quite active just before sunset, while I could hear Eurasian Jay, Red-billed Leiothrix, Eastern Great Tit, and Large-billed Crow.

A small band of Wild Boar were also active, but kept well hidden in the undergrowth – later when I hiked back down to my car I could see where they had been, as they had dug up the side of the trail in some areas near the summit.

A juvenile Grey-faced Buzzard (Butastur indicus)

John Wright

John Wright

John Wright is an Australian wildlife photographer and bird guide based in Kyushu, Japan. John became seriously engaged in nature photography while living in and then Thailand. He returned to Japan in 2008 and has since concentrated on wildlife photography, especially birds. John visits Southeast Asia and Australia regularly, but usually travels within the Japanese archipelago, where he also guides visiting birders and wildlife photography enthusiasts.

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John Wright

John Wright

John Wright is an Australian wildlife photographer and bird guide based in Kyushu, Japan. John became seriously engaged in nature photography while living in Japan and then Thailand. He returned to Japan in 2008 and has since concentrated on wildlife photography, especially birds. John visits Southeast Asia and Australia regularly, but usually travels within the Japanese archipelago, where he also guides visiting birders and wildlife photography enthusiasts.

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