Fieldtrip to Shark Valley

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, regardless of the 11 mile road work, proved to be very interesting. I would say even better than the Burrowing Owls at Brian Piccolo Park. We had been very disappointed with our session at Trail, which we found very neglected and with very few subjects for this time of year.

Backlit and catfish. We had to run for this one and he never gave us a good light angle.

dancing the water looking for fish.

Shark Valley, although not shinning like other years, still gave us plenty to do, especially it was a good workout for photo skills, since the light kept changing rapidly (very common in ). As we came in, it was overcast, and we had to work in ISO 800 to get any kind of shutter speed.

Although I’m a fan of Auto ISO on my Sony cameras, I don’t trust old 7D over ISO 800 and don’t want to have surprises. So I prefer to change manually and make sure my picture is taken at the best possible, given the action gives me time to make decisions.

Great blue Heron expressing his unhappiness at another bird in his territory.

I usually prefer to work wide open, which means f/5.6 on my extended 100-400L IS.
Unless I want more depth of field for more than one subject or very close proximity, blurring shoulders and such.

After mid-morning, the sun was shinning very bright, and the contrast was brutal, especially to get the Snowy Egrets,, that read 4000 s/s even at ISO 400. I didn’t consider going under that, since speed is a bonus in most cases and I’m happy with the grain at 400 ISO, in other than gloomy conditions.

The images opened up the blacks nicely in Lightroom and all the highlights were there after checking them. I was very happy with the results, even though the contrast was very high at the end of the morning.

Juvenile female Anhinga ready to throw herself at the tree. They are not the most graceful landers.

Here are some pictures, and this is a location that we will probably repeat in the second term of the class. Hoping the road work is better by then. If you plan to visit, allow yourself extra time because of the stops you have to make on a one line road.

May the light be with you!

in full breeding colors.

Snowy Egret posing on his Everglades habitat.

showing their ability to walk the reeds.

enjoying the first rays of sun that morning.

Tricolored Heron getting ready to come in after a round of fishing.

Snowy Egret having his crown blown by the wind.

Fabiola Forns

Fabiola Forns

is artistically inclined and after dabbling in creative writing, music and oil painting, has found her true call in wildlife photography. An extensive traveler, she has lived in Europe, New York and Puerto Rico, finally making Miami her permanent home. Fabiola holds a degree in Human Resources from St. Thomas University in Miami, and is also Adjunct Faculty at Miami-Dade College, as photography instructor. She tries to merge visual arts with realistic photographs and her style fluctuates between serene landscapes and bold abstracts.

Fabiola Forns

Fabiola Forns

Fabiola Forns is artistically inclined and after dabbling in creative writing, music and oil painting, has found her true call in wildlife photography. An extensive traveler, she has lived in Europe, New York and Puerto Rico, finally making Miami her permanent home. Fabiola holds a degree in Human Resources from St. Thomas University in Miami, and is also Adjunct Faculty at Miami-Dade College, as photography instructor. She tries to merge visual arts with realistic photographs and her style fluctuates between serene landscapes and bold abstracts.

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Frank Comisar

Wonderful pictures. I especially like the green heron. Well done.

Frank Comisar

Wonderful pictures. I especially like the green heron. Well done.

Carol Duke

Absolutely stellar photography Fabiola! Wow!

Carol Duke
Carol Duke

Absolutely stellar photography Fabiola! Wow!