Red-billed Streamertail (Trochilus polytmus)

Jamaican Hummingbirds

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Jamaican are quite dazzling. A year ago today, while visiting Jamaica, I was blessed to have a visit from a stunning maleRed-billed Streamertail (Trochilus polytmus.)

Early mornings, I stoodon my balcony waiting for them to come sip from the bright hibiscus blossoms covering a large bush just below my railing. During my walks to the sea, I would encounter the hummers high in trees diving into variousblooms. It was always a special sighting and especially exciting to capture a male.

The is also known as the ‘Doctor Bird’ and is endemic to Jamaica. This dazzlinghummer along with the Black-billed Streamertail arethe Island’s National bird.

Red-billed Streamertail (Trochilus polytmus)
Red-billed Streamertail (Trochilus polytmus)
Red-billed Streamertail (Trochilus polytmus)

One sunny morning, a young or a molting male Red-billed Streamertail hummingbird was perched on a wire fence next to a friend’s garden. As I walked nearer, hedid not seem to mind my taking his portrait.

I was amazed the sparkling birdallowed me to get so close. More often, I could hardly see them for their speedy natures. His tail is a long way from what will become the longest tail of any hummingbird the world over.

These remarkable are often sighted in the friendly and quiet area of Treasure Beach.

 

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Carol Duke

Carol Duke

Carol Duke is an artist and farmer who has worked with the land on a Western Massachusetts hillside for over thirty years. During this time her land has evolved into a diverse wildlife habitat. Carol features the flora and fauna that live and visit her farm on her website and blog http://caroldukeflowers.com As vital wildlife habitats are destroyed daily, Carol hopes to inspire others to garden for wildlife, while becoming activists for wild places the world over. Her nature photography has appeared in magazines, books and newspapers.

Carol Duke

Carol Duke

Carol Duke is an artist and farmer who has worked with the land on a Western Massachusetts hillside for over thirty years. During this time her land has evolved into a diverse wildlife habitat. Carol features the flora and fauna that live and visit her farm on her website and blog http://caroldukeflowers.com As vital wildlife habitats are destroyed daily, Carol hopes to inspire others to garden for wildlife, while becoming activists for wild places the world over. Her nature photography has appeared in magazines, books and newspapers.

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