Lark Sparrow

  • 1
    Share


For a day thatthe weather forecasters said wouldbe “Sunny” this morning sure didn’t start off that way. In fact, for the first hour or more the light was very wishy-washy. The clouds were thick to the east and blocking the sun. But… when the sun finally did start to shine one bird made the bad light earlier worth it.

This is the closest I have been to a Lark Sparrow (Chondestes grammacus) to date and this was a very cooperative bird too! I had seen my FOY (first of year) Lark Sparrow last week and hoped that this year I’d be able to get closer and better images of the species. Got it!

Lark Sparrows havebold harlequin facial patterns, a single dark breast spot (not visible here) and a long dark tail with white corners making them amongst the easiest sparrows to identify. Lark Sparrowsbreed here in Utah in sage flats and grasslands,they spend their winters in the southern U. S. to southwest Mexico. I think they are handsome sparrows. Perhaps my luckin photographingthem is changing.

Perched Lark Sparrow – Nikon D300, f6.3, 1/1600, ISO 640, +0.3 EV, Nikkor 200-400mm VR with 1.4x TC at 400mm, natural light

Mia McPherson, OntheWingPhotography.com

Mia McPherson

Mia McPherson

Mia McPherson is a nature lover, wildlife watcher and an avian photographer. Mia first become serious about bird photography when she moved to Florida in 2004. Her recent move to the Salt Lake area of Utah was a great opportunity to continue observing their behavior and photographing them. With so many birds species there easily accessible it wasn’t long before she was hooked. By learning more about each species, she can anticipate their behaviour and create opportunities to obtain ever better images of those species.

Mia McPherson

Mia McPherson

Mia McPherson is a nature lover, wildlife watcher and an avian photographer. Mia first become serious about bird photography when she moved to Florida in 2004. Her recent move to the Salt Lake area of Utah was a great opportunity to continue observing their behavior and photographing them. With so many birds species there easily accessible it wasn’t long before she was hooked. By learning more about each species, she can anticipate their behaviour and create opportunities to obtain ever better images of those species.

Share this post with your friends

  • 1
    Share


Facebook Comments

Leave a Reply

Please Login to comment
avatar