Log Spotted Owl Habitat Again? Didn’t We Already Make That Mistake Once?

  • 2
    Shares


The recent proposed Critical Habitat designation for the Northern Spotted Owl does not protect the threatened species charge the Society for Conservation Biology, The Wildlife Society, American Bird Conservancy, and other groups. Comments submitted by the groups find that, by encouraging controversial and unproven logging practices in owl habitat, the draft plan fails to provide adequate habitat protection essential for the owl’s survival.

The groups are highly critical of the “active management” approach being taken by The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and have requested an Environmental Impact Statement to determine its impact on owl habitat and population trends. A previous review of the Northern Spotted Owl Recovery Plan by scientists at The Wildlife Society has been ignored by USFWS, and the same flaws are now being included by the agency in the Critical Habitat plan. This raises serious questions about the scientific process used by the agency.

Northern Spotted Owl (Strix occidentalis caurina) photo USFWS

You can read the report in its entirety here. You can also read a great article regarding the Barred Owl threat to the Spotted Owl entitled “The Spotted Owl’s New Nemesis” written back in 2009. You might also want to check the USFWS’s Northern Spotted Owl Recovery Information Site page.

Larry Jordan

Larry Jordan

Larry Jordan is an avid birder and amateur photographer living on the Pacific Flyway near the Central Valley of Northern California. He is a board member of his local Audubon Society and is a bird and wildlife conservationist. Larry contributes to several wildlife conservation organizations and is a BirdLife International "Species Champion." He is also Habitat Manager for the Burrowing Owl Conservation Network, an organization dedicated to the protection and restoration of the Western Burrowing Owl population in the United States. Larry has been blogging about birds since September of 2007 at TheBirdersReport.com

Larry Jordan

Larry Jordan

Larry Jordan is an avid birder and amateur photographer living on the Pacific Flyway near the Central Valley of Northern California. He is a board member of his local Audubon Society and is a bird and wildlife conservationist. Larry contributes to several wildlife conservation organizations and is a BirdLife International "Species Champion." He is also Habitat Manager for the Burrowing Owl Conservation Network, an organization dedicated to the protection and restoration of the Western Burrowing Owl population in the United States. Larry has been blogging about birds since September of 2007 at TheBirdersReport.com

Share this post with your friends

  • 2
    Shares


Facebook Comments

2
Leave a Reply

Please Login to comment
avatar
Susan Lee

Shame on us humans if we do not exercise consideration for the fellow beings with whom we are charged to share the biosphere. Good work!

Douglas Trent
Douglas Trent

As the author of the American Forests chapter of the Mother Earth Handbook, I know that the last time around, the logging industry blamed the loss of jobs form closed mills on the protections for the owls, yet total logging actually rose. Whole trees were being sold to Japanese milling ships, which would take them into international waters. There they would mill them into boards, then return to the US shore to sell the finished product. As a result, jobs at ports increases.

Thank you for bringing this threat to light!

Cheers, Douglas Trent