Spring Robins

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I took this picture of my local on the first day of spring this year.

We had come through a very cold winter. Like some robins in these parts, this one stayed north. I fed him raisins. There were days when it was so cold that he’d take a raisin and hop away into a place sheltered from the wind to eat it. He kept his feathers puffed up for insulation and often hunkered down so his legs were covered by his belly feathers.

This is how he looks today. No need to puff up feathers on a warm day in May. Doesn’t he look relatively sleek and leggy? I know this is the same bird because during winter he learned to come to a platform very close to my window for raisins and he still does; the other birds are wary of coming so close.

I took this picture of my local American robin on the first day of spring this year. Click to enlarge.
We had come through a very cold winter. Like some robins in these parts, this one stayed north. I fed him raisins. There were days when it was so cold that he’d take a raisin and hop away into a place sheltered from the wind to eat it. He kept his feathers puffed up for insulation and often hunkered down so his legs were covered by his belly feathers.
This is how he looks today. No need to puff up feathers on a warm day in May. Doesn’t he look relatively sleek and leggy? I know this is the same bird because during winter he learned to come to a platform very close to my window for raisins and he still does; the other birds are wary of coming so close.
Here’s how he looks when he’s singing.
And he is not alone! He’s showing up with this one that I think might be planning to build a nest with him. She is more brown above than black and overall more pale. Click to enlarge and compare them.

 

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Julie Feinstein

Julie Feinstein

I am a Collection Manager at the American Museum of Natural History, an author, and a photographer. I live in New York City. I recently published my first popular science book, Field Guide to Urban Wildlife, an illustrated collection of natural history essays about common animals. I update my blog, Urban Wildlife Guide, every Sunday.

Julie Feinstein

Julie Feinstein

I am a Collection Manager at the American Museum of Natural History, an author, and a photographer. I live in New York City. I recently published my first popular science book, Field Guide to Urban Wildlife, an illustrated collection of natural history essays about common animals. I update my blog, Urban Wildlife Guide, every Sunday.

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Georgia Ashby

I copied you when I saw your post this winter. Raisins and grapes on a branch too. Robin was happy until starlings caught on. Fortunately the robin does get up earliest. Thanks.