Those guys from the coast



Savannah Sparrow

I’ve still got some stragglers from recent trips to Anahuac NWR. And whywhywhy do I not have anything clever to say anymore? Maybe one day I’ll be back to the old Johnny Nutcase.

So, that Seaside Sparrow, as mentioned in another post, was a bit of a weirdo. He and a bud were all hanging out on the rocks like they actually wanted their photos taken.

Seasides don’t do that, who do they think they are!?

Black-bellied Whistling Ducks

For some reason, I was actually able to get photos of Black-bellied Whistling ducks, which is also weird.

Because I seem to have pretty horrible luck with duck photos for whatever reason.

King/Clapper Rail hybrid

The rail was pretty fancy. I was able to stare him down for about ten minutes (why don’t I have more photos?) while he snarfed up some tasty treats.

There was a Great Egret and a Tri-colored hanging out in the same area, with some terns in and out also. Good fishing spot I presume.

Oh yeah, I had a hard time identifying this guy and so I’ve been told it’s a Clapper/King hybrid. Or as some nerds refer to it: Cling Rails. I’m not that level of dork, so I will not fondly refer to said rail as a Cling, I just can’t do it.

Juvenile Black-bellied Whistling Ducks

Sanderlings

Ruddy Turnstone

Seaside Sparrow

Jill Wussow

Jill Wussow

Jill Wussow, 31, is a seasonal field biologist, nature photographer and nomad. She has worked with several federally endangered bird species (including the Golden-cheeked Warbler, Black-capped Vireo and Piping Plover), sea turtles, and bats all over the United States. She is rarely in one place for more than a few months at a time and her whereabouts are often confusing. Field work has given her great opportunity to travel often and meshes with her passion for wildlife and nature photography perfectly. Through her photography, Jill hopes to convey her love and respect of the natural world.

Jill Wussow

Jill Wussow

Jill Wussow is a seasonal field biologist, nature photographer and nomad. She has worked with several federally endangered bird species (including the Golden-cheeked Warbler, Black-capped Vireo and Piping Plover), sea turtles, and bats all over the United States. She is rarely in one place for more than a few months at a time and her whereabouts are often confusing. Field work has given her great opportunity to travel often and meshes with her passion for wildlife and nature photography perfectly. Through her photography, Jill hopes to convey her love and respect of the natural world.

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