Satpura one of India’s least-known national parks

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Satpura Tiger Reserve is possibly central India’s least-known national parks, but is emerging as one of India’s must visit wildlife destinations.

The reserve itself covers an area of 524 square kilometers, and  along with the adjoining Bori and Panchmarhi Sanctuaries forms one of the larger Tiger reserves. Set up in 1981 and situated south of Hoshangabad in the Satpura Hill range, from which the park takes its name.

We had the opportunity to visit the reserve a few years ago but decided at the time to stick to the more well know parks which reportedly offer some of India’s best tiger viewing.

More about our trip and the wildlife of the Park on our posts at :- https://adwimages.co.uk/

Sloth Bear in Satpura NP
Satpura is more renowned for its sightings of Sloth Bears

If your main focus is Tigers, Satpura might not be at the top of the list.

However, if you want to see just what else Central India has in both wildlife and birdlife then it has much to offer.

As well as being  one of the rare places in India where you can experience a safari on foot.

Native to India the Malabar Giant Squirrel

At the moment not many travellers add Satpura to their itineraries. This seems to be partly due to the rumors that the wildlife, in particular the star species, are less habituated to humans than in other reserves.

Therefore they tend to be shy and more difficult to see. However in recent years things have begun to change.

The park itself is part of the Central Indian forest ecosystem, rich in biodiversity. Consisting of  a number of sandstone peaks, narrow gorges, ravines, rivers,a reservoir, dense Sal and mixed forests all of which add to the parks natural beauty.

Leopard captured on a twlight drive

Earlier this year we visited Satpura  park with a group staying in the buffer zone at the Reni Pani Jungle Lodge.

Fully aware that we would be lucky to see Tigers but might have better luck coming across Sloth bears. This is a species for which the park is famed.


After a full week in the area we encountered several Sloth bears, two with cubs riding on their backs. We watched a Leopard hunt and came across a Leopard cub on a night drive. This is something else that can be done in the parks buffer zone.

We also, on one afternoon, had some of the best views of a male Tiger that we have had in India. Not to mention 171 bird species and other sightings of the rich wildlife of the Central Indian ecosystem.

This including the Chausingha or four-horned antelope and the chinkara antelope. We also had good views of  the colourful Indian Giant squirrel.

If you are thinking about Tiger reserves in central India its well worth adding Satpura to an itinerary. Satpura wont disappoint.

Male Tiger in Satpura National Park
Sub Adult Male Tiger in Satpura National Park

More about our trip and the wildlife of the Park on our posts at :- https://adwimages.co.uk/

Alan De Witt

Alan De Witt

After spending a career that demanded much of my time and energy. I'm now retired and finally found some time to pursue an interest in wildlife and photography as well as putting together a website C & A's Wild Images. I now live in Norfolk, an ideal location in the UK to see wildlife and over the years have also had the opportunity to visit and spend time using the camera in interesting and sometimes remote parts of the world. I first became interested in trying to capture wildlife images when I left university in the days of slide film. Initially I used two compact cameras with 20+ zooms but now have moved to a professional Canon SLR set-up.

Alan De Witt

Alan De Witt

After spending a career that demanded much of my time and energy. I'm now retired and finally found some time to pursue an interest in wildlife and photography as well as putting together a website C & A's Wild Images. I now live in Norfolk, an ideal location in the UK to see wildlife and over the years have also had the opportunity to visit and spend time using the camera in interesting and sometimes remote parts of the world. I first became interested in trying to capture wildlife images when I left university in the days of slide film. Initially I used two compact cameras with 20+ zooms but now have moved to a professional Canon SLR set-up.

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