We’ve got a Whooper

  • 23
    Shares


Hey lookit! It’s a ! This was a pleasant surprise, definitely wasn’t expecting to come across any whooping cranes any time soon.

She (yes she – her name is Latka and she was hatched on June 13, 2013) was hanging out with a pretty big sandhill flock (about 8oish).

She was banded and luckily, with the big boy lens I could read the bands…which is why I know her life story now, which is kinda fun.

If you’re not aware, whooping cranes are one of the most endangered birds in North America, with less than 400 of them in the wild.

I’ve seen them a couple times on the Texas coast, so it was pretty cool to see Latka in .

Respect these guys, guys! They’ve been way too close to extinction in the past (at one point, there were only 16 in the wild. Shit. Unacceptable.)

Reintroduction and captive breeding have really helped these birds out and their numbers are up, but they definitely still need our help.

Whooping Crane with Sandhill Cranes
Whooping Crane with Sandhill Cranes
Whooping Crane with Sandhill Cranes

Jill Wussow

Jill Wussow

, 31, is a seasonal field biologist, nature photographer and nomad. She has worked with several federally endangered bird species (including the Golden-cheeked Warbler, Black-capped Vireo and Piping Plover), sea turtles, and bats all over the United States. She is rarely in one place for more than a few months at a time and her whereabouts are often confusing. Field work has given her great opportunity to travel often and meshes with her passion for wildlife and nature photography perfectly. Through her photography, Jill hopes to convey her love and respect of the natural world.

Jill Wussow

Jill Wussow

Jill Wussow is a seasonal field biologist, nature photographer and nomad. She has worked with several federally endangered bird species (including the Golden-cheeked Warbler, Black-capped Vireo and Piping Plover), sea turtles, and bats all over the United States. She is rarely in one place for more than a few months at a time and her whereabouts are often confusing. Field work has given her great opportunity to travel often and meshes with her passion for wildlife and nature photography perfectly. Through her photography, Jill hopes to convey her love and respect of the natural world.

Share this post with your friends

  • 23
    Shares


Facebook Comments

Leave a Reply

Please Login to comment
avatar