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Aug 062013
 

Frikkie du Toit runs a camp in South Africa, which today is still surrounded by African wildlife. Frikkie is a hunter and guide who was born and raised in Africa. He has been hunting wildlife in Africa for 20 years and has guided clients on hunts for all of the Big 5, the Dangerous 7 and all wildlife species of the plains.

Participants in such hunts include Doug Hamric, Pat and Nicole Reeve, Jim Hall, Jim Barnworth. The Spanish King Juan Carlos was criticized for hunting elephants and other wildlife species in Botswana in 2012 for which he later apologized. (see photos below).

Knowing that as few as 32,000 lions are left in the wild and 600 lions are killed every year on trophy hunts, The United States government is considering whether to add lions to the list of species protected by the Endangered Species Act. Which type of recreation do you think generates more revenue for the economy of South Africa?

Wildlife hunting or Wildlife Photography?

Can these two activities exist in parallel, and is wildlife hunting really sustainable? Please let us know your opinion and leave your comments below.

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Jim Hall with Albino Lion Male – Copyright © Frikkie du Toit Safari’s.

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Doug Hamric with male lion he has just shot – Copyright © Frikkie du Toit Safari’s.

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Doug Hamric with Gemsbok – Copyright © Frikkie du Toit Safari’s.

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Jim Hall with Male Lion – Copyright © Frikkie du Toit Safari’s.

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Copyright © Frikkie du Toit Safari’s.

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Copyright © Frikkie du Toit Safari’s.

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Copyright © Frikkie du Toit Safari’s.

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Copyright © Frikkie du Toit Safari’s.

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Copyright © Frikkie du Toit Safari’s.

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Copyright © Frikkie du Toit Safari’s.

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Copyright © Frikkie du Toit Safari’s.

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Copyright © Frikkie du Toit Safari’s.

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Copyright © Frikkie du Toit Safari’s.

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Copyright © Frikkie du Toit Safari’s.

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Copyright © Frikkie du Toit Safari’s.

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Copyright © Frikkie du Toit Safari’s.

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Copyright © Frikkie du Toit Safari’s.

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Copyright © Frikkie du Toit Safari’s.

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Copyright © Frikkie du Toit Safari’s.

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Copyright © Frikkie du Toit Safari’s.

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Copyright © Frikkie du Toit Safari’s.

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Copyright © Frikkie du Toit Safari’s.

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Copyright © Frikkie du Toit Safari’s.

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Copyright © Frikkie du Toit Safari’s.

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Copyright © Frikkie du Toit Safari’s.

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Copyright © Frikkie du Toit Safari’s.

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Jim Barnworth with Crocodile – Copyright © Frikkie du Toit Safari’s.

Spanish King Juan Carlos (right), pictured during a previous elephant hunting trip in Africa, has come in for criticism

Juan Carlos (left, on a previous trip) has been slammed for his upper-class pursuit as his country goes through the economic doldrums


Leave a Comment

  • RondaGreen

    Just wondering what the reactions of the general population would be to seeing the corpse of their favourite racehorse, or even shattered remains of public statues or shredded works of art. What would their views be of the grinning perpetrators sitting next to the remains? Maybe there are valid conservation reasons for some of the hunting, but I still find these photos grotesque.

  • Victor Pedraza

    Scandalous!

  • Mark Brierley

    These aren’t human there monsters who in there right mind would want to kill any of them beautiful animals

  • Caroline

    Chris Hallamore, it is the trophy hunters who are killing the strongest and best for their trophies. How can you claim it is because of these idiots that we still have the few endangered large animal species left? It is exactly because of trophy hunting that entire species of large animals are in decline. What kind of moron kills a magnificent wild animal simply to hang its head or horns on a wall? There is absolutely no justification for the mindless murder of these animals and you should be ashamed of yourself for having the gall to defend such barbaric behaviour, but of course you would because you are part of it. I don’t think anyone is fooled by wildlife organisations that condone such ‘management’ of wildlife. The best manager is nature and our species is the only one that behaves like a cancer on the earth. I’m tired of listening to the excuses of people like you who make money by encouraging rich idiots to play out their fantasies at the expense of endangered wild animals. They go home with their trophies, eat their steak and while the once beautiful animal is nothing more than remnants hanging on a wall – SICK.

  • Carla Pillow

    If you aren’t going to eat something … don’t kill it. And if you are going to kill it you shouldn’t be allowed to use a weapon that gives you such an advantage.This is purely and simply about the sadistic pleasure these ‘people’ get from killing such powerful animals….. a competion that in reality if it was fair would see them dead. Mindless killing… nothing to do with population control or anything similar….it’s a disgrace.

  • http://facebook.com/profile.php?id=682097113 Wendy Norman

    I cannot understand why anyone would want to kill these beautiful creatures. Who are these people that get pleasure in looking at the photo of themselves with their ‘trophy’. Makes me very sad.

  • http://facebook.com/profile.php?id=1344540213 Alan Mattison

    I have hunted more than 40 years but only by the principle ” If you’re not going to eat it, then don’t shoot it!” and I mean eat it yourself. Trophy hunting is a dispicable interest enjoyed by people degrading the title of hunter.

  • Mark McCandlish

    When I see the disgusting photographs above, and the proud, smiling faces of these killers, I am filled with an indescribable emptiness. As a gun owner myself, who maintains a few weapons strictly for self-defense, I cannot comprehend the perverse pleasure these shameless human beings take in destroying such beautiful animals. I do not find any credibility in the argument that the practice is beneficial to mankind and wildlife alike as a “management issue”. Not with the level of poaching that is so pervasive across the African continent. And I’ve never seen an instance of anyone who eats Lion meat. And shooting an Elephant? A big, slow-moving target? Takes about as much skill as picking your nose. Something any three-year-old could do. And then what? Dress it out with a chain saw, and haul the meat away with a dump truck? Probably not. Looks like nothing more than a sick, sick photo-op. I hope they all rot in hell for eternity.

    • Elena N.Akasha

      you have a standing ovation from me!!! i agree 100%.

  • http://facebook.com/profile.php?id=1344540213 Alan Mattison

    I have hunted more than 40 years but only by the principle ” If you’re not going to eat it, then don’t shoot it!” and I mean eat it yourself. Trophy hunting is a dispicable interest enjoyed by people degrading the title of hunter.

  • http://facebook.com/profile.php?id=1344540213 Alan Mattison

    I have hunted more than 40 years but only by the principle ” If you’re not going to eat it, then don’t shoot it!” and I mean eat it yourself. Trophy hunting is a dispicable interest enjoyed by people degrading the title of hunter.

  • Dave Milsom

    Such beautiful animals will soon be gone. Poachers and hunters are to blame.
    Where is the respect for life ?

    • ArtisticWildlife Taxidermist

      More wildlife now than 100 years ago!!! Get the facts not emotions.

      • Elena N.Akasha

        i suggest you take a look at the stats…maybe via CITES. it is the opposite actually.

  • http://facebook.com/profile.php?id=1344540213 Alan Mattison

    I have hunted more than 40 years but only by the principle ” If you’re not going to eat it, then don’t shoot it!” and I mean eat it yourself. Trophy hunting is a dispicable interest enjoyed by people degrading the title of hunter.

  • http://facebook.com/profile.php?id=1344540213 Alan Mattison

    I have hunted more than 40 years but only by the principle ” If you’re not going to eat it, then don’t shoot it!” and I mean eat it yourself. Trophy hunting is a dispicable interest enjoyed by people degrading the title of hunter.

  • Chris Hallamore

    When trophy hunting is conducted responsibly, there is a huge benefit to wildlife conservation. Put differently, when wildlife has a value to the land owner, the game changes!.

    30 years ago In Southern Africa, game had no value and the land was over grazed
    by cattle, sheep and goats. Safari hunting has changed all this. The livestock
    and their fences have gone.

    If all the hunting areas, were only used for game viewing or photographic safaris.
    There simply are not enough tourists with sufficient financial resources to
    partake in luxury Safaris.

    Management of wildlife requires reducing the numbers by hunting. This takes place on all wild life reserves particularly in the case of elephants.

    The problem is that this management of wildlife is not possible in most African
    counties due to poor or non Governance.

    • Daniel Rabkin

      I’d be interested in seeing some facts to back up those statements. It’s good that there’s less livestock, and I do believe that many people are hypocritical when they criticize hunting as they chow down on a Big Mac. I think it’s important to encourage people all over the world to eat less meat and dairy, for this and other reasons. But that’s a side note. Surely there are activities people can do to earn money other than having people pay to kill these amazing creatures? Some other way for economic development. They don’t have to do this in Costa Rica, and they seem to be doing great. How much money is someone like Frikkie du Twat making, and is he using any of that money on conservation and education? As for the management of wildlife argument, I’d want to see some hard evidence that it’s beneficial. If it’s a healthy ecosystem, it shouldn’t be necessary to “cull the herds”. And while it might perhaps make sense to thin out the wildebeast herds, (I’m not so familiar with this ecosystem), I can’t imagine any reason why killing a lion could be beneficial in that respect. And let’s just say for a second that this type of trophy-hunting tourism somehow helps the economy and conserving the land. What about the message it sends in the context of all the poaching that’s going on? How can you look at a poor person in Africa and tell him not to kill the elephant or the rhino and to not sell the horn/ivory to Vietnam or China, when you’ve just shot an elephant yourself?

      • Chris Hallamore

        Firstly it is an undeniable fact that men have an instinct to hunt . This instinct might be suppressed or denied in this modern world. Secondly legitimate trophy hunting is far removed from poaching ivory or rhino horn for china.

        When I was in my early twenties in zimbabwe , each landowner had to purchase a hunting permit to hunt the game on his own property and basically game didn’t have a value whereas, the livestock had considerable value. The game laws were changed where the owner of the land owned the wildlife. Safari hunting arrived and the value of wildlife was soon double or triple the value of cattle. In a short space of time the wildlife population out the National parks increased 10 fold. In many areas all the fences were removed and the cattle sold. This is true of many areas of South Africa and Namibia. Stop the hunting and the beautiful zebra kudu and wildebeest etc will be replaced by cattle, goats and sheep. Unfortunately this no longer the case in Zimbabwe due to zero governance

        The percentage of animals shot by trophy hunters is very small and after the trophy hunting season has passed , there is a requirement to cull large numbers of some species for the required management .

        During the 80,s in zimbabwe before Mugabe lost the plot, there were approximately 40,000 elephant and 6000 were culled each year. Where I was hunting the area we leased was 200 sq miles and our quota of bull elephants was 4 and 20 cow elephant

        Today there some 100,000 elephant out of control due to a lack of management ( http://www.eturbonews.com/37745/zimbabwe-elephants-jumbo-problem) Whether this figure is accurate or or not is debatable but there are far far too many

        In conclusion if you own a piece of privately owned ranch land in Africa , you have to manage the wildlife and this has to be paid for and in most cases photographic safaris do not earn sufficient revenue to make it either profitable or sustainable. If you increase the number of visitors you then create additional eco problems

        The debate will continue but the facts speak for themselves

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