Daily Dose of PIKA



Ohhh. I guess I may have scared some people off with my last few rants about Malheur and grazing, huh?

Guess that’s what happens when you give a damn. “Sentiment without action is the ruin of the soul” my friends.

Passion, it’s healthy. Truth and justice, I like it. (Below: the tiniest pika I’ve seen yet. So itty bitty!! Below: caching some tasty treats)

But anyway, it’s been way too long without a pika post. So go I give to you some of the cutest little nuggets out there.

Good lord these guys don’t even know. I’m gonna start crying just thinking about them.

SO CUTE. “See pikas in the wild” – put that on your bucket list, seriously.

They’ll turn your frown upside down. (Below: Jabba the Pika)

As adorable as they are though, they’re struggling. So really, you should go see them before even worse things happen: (they’re already gone from a third of their known habitat thanks to climate change).

They are one of the most susceptible species to a warming temperature and do not tolerate heat (over 78 degrees and they can die of exposure. Horrible!).

It’s really devastating that they are not doing well. We really need to get our act together because we are destroying every single thing that matters and it’s unacceptable.

We are a pretty disgusting species!

 

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Jill Wussow

Jill Wussow

Jill Wussow is a seasonal field biologist, nature photographer and nomad. She has worked with several federally endangered bird species (including the Golden-cheeked Warbler, Black-capped Vireo and Piping Plover), sea turtles, and bats all over the United States. She is rarely in one place for more than a few months at a time and her whereabouts are often confusing. Field work has given her great opportunity to travel often and meshes with her passion for wildlife and nature photography perfectly. Through her photography, Jill hopes to convey her love and respect of the natural world.

Jill Wussow

Jill Wussow

Jill Wussow is a seasonal field biologist, nature photographer and nomad. She has worked with several federally endangered bird species (including the Golden-cheeked Warbler, Black-capped Vireo and Piping Plover), sea turtles, and bats all over the United States. She is rarely in one place for more than a few months at a time and her whereabouts are often confusing. Field work has given her great opportunity to travel often and meshes with her passion for wildlife and nature photography perfectly. Through her photography, Jill hopes to convey her love and respect of the natural world.

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Lynn Ledgerwood

<3 those little pikas 🙂