PIPL are People Too!

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Took a quick trip to the coast in December to check out some areas we hadn’t been to yet (Sea Rim State Park and parts of ). Camped out and birded/played the next day.

Saw a lot of good birds but I was happy mainly because I got my plover fix. Piping, snowy, semi-palmated and . About a dozen Pipings- a whole bundle of cute! I’m just going to say it: If you don’t like plovers, something may be wrong with you. (Top: . with a Semi-palmated running in front.

Below: Piping Plovers with a couple Semi-palamateds thrown in)

Wild Bird WednesdayCommunal Global

(I also saw a dead blue-footed booby on the beach, which I’m well aware sounds utterly insane, but this has caused an uproar with some pretentiousand very a$$holey Texasbirders. It was the one and only time I didn’t have my camera on me- end of the day, getting dark, just taking a casual stroll along the beach looking for treasures in the sargassum seaweed. Though I’d love to delve deeper into much about that, I’m refraining)

Jill Wussow

Jill Wussow

is a seasonal field biologist, nature photographer and nomad. She has worked with several federally endangered bird species (including the Golden-cheeked Warbler, Black-capped Vireo and Piping Plover), sea turtles, and bats all over the United States. She is rarely in one place for more than a few months at a time and her whereabouts are often confusing. Field work has given her great opportunity to travel often and meshes with her passion for wildlife and nature photography perfectly. Through her photography, Jill hopes to convey her love and respect of the natural world.

Jill Wussow

Jill Wussow

Jill Wussow is a seasonal field biologist, nature photographer and nomad. She has worked with several federally endangered bird species (including the Golden-cheeked Warbler, Black-capped Vireo and Piping Plover), sea turtles, and bats all over the United States. She is rarely in one place for more than a few months at a time and her whereabouts are often confusing. Field work has given her great opportunity to travel often and meshes with her passion for wildlife and nature photography perfectly. Through her photography, Jill hopes to convey her love and respect of the natural world.

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Claudio Silva Hennings

El chorlo nevado que encontramos en las costas de Chile, Charadrius nivosus occidentalis (Cabamis), tiene las patas grisáceas, como la primera foto de este posteo, que en las otras fotos tienen las patas amarillas, por lo que me gustaría saber el nombre de la especie que aquí se muestra.