The End of Spring Birding..

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Upland Sandpiper

Baby Red-winged Blackbird

Birding Group

Upland Sandpiper, Photo courtesy Tony Beck

Upland Sandpiper, Photo courtesy Pavel Dvorak

Scenery

Pine Warbler, Photo courtesy Roger Cobbledick

Tuesday June 26:

We started the morning at dawn in Gatineau Park with the plan of exploring all along the beautiful Gatineau Escarpment.

Our first great excitement was a cooperative Upland Sandpiper perched on a fence post near Breckenridge. The fields seem fairly active with Bobolinks and Eastern Meadowlarks. We found a family of highly vocal American Kestrels near Quyon.

At Elmside, near Norway Bay, we were surprised to find a female Pine Warbler out in the open, completely outside of her normal habitat. We were enjoying a pair of Eastern Bluebirds when the Pine Warbler was spotted dancing around a fence post beside the road.

We continued on to Calumet Island, where we observed an adult Red-tailed Hawk guarding its nest containing two chicks.

At Lawless Lake, up in the hills past Campbell’s Bay, we observed two adult Common Loons with their single chick.

Despite the strong wind and intense sunshine, we had a day-list of 70 birds.

Canada Goose

Branta canadensis

Mallard

Anas platyrhynchos

Wild Turkey

Meleagris gallopavo

Common Loon

Gavia immer

Double-crested Cormorant

Phalacrocorax auritus

Great Blue Heron

Ardea herodias

Black-crowned Night-Heron

Nycticorax nycticorax

Turkey Vulture

Cathartes aura

Northern Harrier

Circus cyaneus

Broad-winged Hawk

Buteo platypterus

Red-tailed Hawk

Buteo jamaicensis

American Kestrel

Falco sparverius

Virginia Rail

Rallus limicola

Killdeer

Charadrius vociferus

Spotted Sandpiper

Actitis macularius

Upland Sandpiper

Bartramia longicauda

Wilson’s Snipe

Gallinago delicata

Ring-billed Gull

Larus delawarensis

Rock Pigeon

Columba livia

Mourning Dove

Zenaida macroura

Belted Kingfisher

Megaceryle alcyon

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

Sphyrapicus varius

Downy Woodpecker

Picoides pubescens

Hairy Woodpecker

Picoides villosus

Northern Flicker

Colaptes auratus

Eastern Wood-Pewee

Contopus virens

Least Flycatcher

Empidonax minimus

Eastern Phoebe

Sayornis phoebe

Great Crested Flycatcher

Myiarchus crinitus

Eastern Kingbird

Tyrannus tyrannus

Warbling Vireo

Vireo gilvus

Red-eyed Vireo

Vireo olivaceus

Blue Jay

Cyanocitta cristata

American Crow

Corvus brachyrhynchos

Common Raven

Corvus corax

Tree Swallow

Tachycineta bicolor

Barn Swallow

Hirundo rustica

Cliff Swallow

Petrochelidon pyrrhonota

Black-capped Chickadee

Poecile atricapillus

Red-breasted Nuthatch

Sitta canadensis

Eastern Bluebird

Sialia sialis

Veery

Catharus fuscescens

American Robin

Turdus migratorius

Gray Catbird

Dumetella carolinensis

European Starling

Sturnus vulgaris

Cedar Waxwing

Bombycilla cedrorum

Ovenbird

Seiurus aurocapilla

Black-and-white Warbler

Mniotilta varia

Nashville Warbler

Oreothlypis ruficapilla

Common Yellowthroat

Geothlypis trichas

American Redstart

Setophaga ruticilla

Yellow Warbler

Setophaga petechia

Chestnut-sided Warbler

Setophaga pensylvanica

Pine Warbler

Setophaga pinus

Black-thr. Green Warbler

Setophaga virens

Chipping Sparrow

Spizella passerina

Savannah Sparrow

Passerculus sandwichensis

Song Sparrow

Melospiza melodia

Swamp Sparrow

Melospiza georgiana

White-throated Sparrow

Zonotrichia albicollis

Northern Cardinal

Cardinalis cardinalis

Bobolink

Dolichonyx oryzivorus

Red-winged Blackbird

Agelaius phoeniceus

Eastern Meadowlark

Sturnella magna

Common Grackle

Quiscalus quiscula

Baltimore Oriole

Icterus galbula

Purple Finch

Carpodacus purpureus

House Finch

Carpodacus mexicanus

American Goldfinch

Spinus tristis

House Sparrow

Passer domesticus

Photographing Great Egret at Andrew Haydon Park

Andrew Haydon Park

Female Hooded Merganser with chick

Birding Group

Thursday June 28:

It was a hot day with warm breeze.

We started at Andrew Haydon Park where we watched the now-famous Hooded Merganser and her four chicks.

We ventured out west of Ottawa stopping at Constance Creek where we got American Bittern and Virginia Rail. We made a sudden stop along the Thomas Dolan Parkway when a Scarlet Tanager flew over the road. Several more birds came into view here, including a female Blackburnian Warbler.

We ended our morning at the Burntlands where we saw Clay-colored, Field, Savannah and Grasshopper Sparrows.

Our day-list reached 60 species.

Canada Goose

Branta canadensis

Wood Duck

Aix sponsa

Mallard

Anas platyrhynchos

Hooded Merganser

Lophodytes cucullatus

American Bittern

Botaurus lentiginosus

Great Blue Heron

Ardea herodias

Great Egret

Ardea alba

Black-crowned Night-Heron

Nycticorax nycticorax

Turkey Vulture

Cathartes aura

Osprey

Pandion haliaetus

Northern Harrier

Circus cyaneus

Virginia Rail

Rallus limicola

Killdeer

Charadrius vociferus

Spotted Sandpiper

Actitis macularius

Wilson’s Snipe

Gallinago delicata

Ring-billed Gull

Larus delawarensis

Common Tern

Sterna hirundo

Rock Pigeon

Columba livia

Mourning Dove

Zenaida macroura

Belted Kingfisher

Megaceryle alcyon

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

Sphyrapicus varius

Downy Woodpecker

Picoides pubescens

Hairy Woodpecker

Picoides villosus

Northern Flicker

Colaptes auratus

Eastern Wood-Pewee

Contopus virens

Eastern Phoebe

Sayornis phoebe

Eastern Kingbird

Tyrannus tyrannus

Warbling Vireo

Vireo gilvus

Red-eyed Vireo

Vireo olivaceus

Blue Jay

Cyanocitta cristata

American Crow

Corvus brachyrhynchos

Common Raven

Corvus corax

N – Rough-winged Swallow

Stelgidopteryx serripennis

Purple Martin

Progne subis

Barn Swallow

Hirundo rustica

Black-capped Chickadee

Poecile atricapillus

White-breasted Nuthatch

Sitta carolinensis

Veery

Catharus fuscescens

American Robin

Turdus migratorius

Brown Thrasher

Toxostoma rufum

European Starling

Sturnus vulgaris

Cedar Waxwing

Bombycilla cedrorum

Black-and-white Warbler

Mniotilta varia

Common Yellowthroat

Geothlypis trichas

Blackburnian Warbler

Setophaga fusca

Yellow Warbler

Setophaga petechia

Chestnut-sided Warbler

Setophaga pensylvanica

Chipping Sparrow

Spizella passerina

Clay-colored Sparrow

Spizella pallida

Field Sparrow

Spizella pusilla

Savannah Sparrow

Passerculus sandwichensis

Grasshopper Sparrow

Ammodramus savannarum

Song Sparrow

Melospiza melodia

Swamp Sparrow

Melospiza georgiana

White-throated Sparrow

Zonotrichia albicollis

Scarlet Tanager

Piranga olivacea

Rose-breasted Grosbeak

Pheucticus ludovicianus

Red-winged Blackbird

Agelaius phoeniceus

Common Grackle

Quiscalus quiscula

American Goldfinch

Spinus tristis

Savannah Sparrow

Black & White Warbler

Saturday June 30:

It was a glorious warm but windy morning.

We started the day at Petrie Island, only spending a brief time checking out the causeway for birdies.

We then went to Giroux Pond, followed by Embrum and Casselman Lagoons. At Embrum we found a few Lesser Yellowlegs and Least Sandpipers. At Casselman we had a female Greater Scaup. These are the first fall migrants – right on schedule!

We ended the excursion at Carlsbad Lane where we had Meadowlark and Upland Sandpiper participating in a singing contest.

Our day-list again came to 60 species of birds.

Canada Goose

Branta canadensis

Wood Duck

Aix sponsa

Mallard

Anas platyrhynchos

Blue-winged Teal

Anas discors

Northern Shoveler

Anas clypeata

Green-winged Teal

Anas crecca

Greater Scaup

Aythya marila

Ruddy Duck

Oxyura jamaicensis

American Bittern

Botaurus lentiginosus

Great Blue Heron

Ardea herodias

Turkey Vulture

Cathartes aura

Northern Harrier

Circus cyaneus

Red-tailed Hawk

Buteo jamaicensis

Virginia Rail

Rallus limicola

Common Gallinule/Moorhen

Gallinula galeata

Killdeer

Charadrius vociferus

Spotted Sandpiper

Actitis macularius

Lesser Yellowlegs

Tringa flavipes

Upland Sandpiper

Bartramia longicauda

Least Sandpiper

Calidris minutilla

Wilson’s Snipe

Gallinago delicata

Ring-billed Gull

Larus delawarensis

Rock Pigeon

Columba livia

Mourning Dove

Zenaida macroura

Belted Kingfisher

Megaceryle alcyon

Downy Woodpecker

Picoides pubescens

Northern Flicker

Colaptes auratus

Least Flycatcher

Empidonax minimus

Great Crested Flycatcher

Myiarchus crinitus

Eastern Kingbird

Tyrannus tyrannus

Warbling Vireo

Vireo gilvus

Red-eyed Vireo

Vireo olivaceus

American Crow

Corvus brachyrhynchos

Common Raven

Corvus corax

Tree Swallow

Tachycineta bicolor

Barn Swallow

Hirundo rustica

Cliff Swallow

Petrochelidon pyrrhonota

Black-capped Chickadee

Poecile atricapillus

White-breasted Nuthatch

Sitta carolinensis

Marsh Wren

Cistothorus palustris

Eastern Bluebird

Sialia sialis

American Robin

Turdus migratorius

Gray Catbird

Dumetella carolinensis

European Starling

Sturnus vulgaris

Cedar Waxwing

Bombycilla cedrorum

Common Yellowthroat

Geothlypis trichas

Yellow Warbler

Setophaga petechia

Chipping Sparrow

Spizella passerina

Savannah Sparrow

Passerculus sandwichensis

Song Sparrow

Melospiza melodia

Swamp Sparrow

Melospiza georgiana

Northern Cardinal

Cardinalis cardinalis

Bobolink

Dolichonyx oryzivorus

Red-winged Blackbird

Agelaius phoeniceus

Eastern Meadowlark

Sturnella magna

Common Grackle

Quiscalus quiscula

Brown-headed Cowbird

Molothrus ater

House Finch

Carpodacus mexicanus

American Goldfinch

Spinus tristis

House Sparrow

Passer domesticus

Until next time..

Visit our website:Always An Adventure

Nina Stavlund

Nina Stavlund

Nina is Norwegian, an extensive world traveller, and is now living in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. She's also a passionate birder and nature lover. She's a professional photographer, graduated from "Bilder Nordic School of Photography" in Oslo, Norway. Her award-winning work appears in many catalogues, magazines, postcards, websites, calendars and more. Nina, & her husband Tony Beck, offer local excursions, international tours and photographic services through their company "Always An Adventure Inc". Nina also conducts photography and photo editing courses.

Nina Stavlund

Nina Stavlund

Professional Photographer accepting new assignments! After working as an Executive/Personal Assistant for 15 years, mainly in the oil and gas business in Norway, I needed a change in my life. Since photography had been a passion since I was a child, I wanted to do something creative and meaningful in this field. This inspired me to visit Greece for 3 wonderful years. After returning to Norway, I decided it was time to become a professional photographer/artist. In 2010, I graduated from “Bilder Nordic School of Photography” in Oslo. At the same time, I was working full time with the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) International Arctic Program. In addition to nature & wildlife photography, I also do lifestyle, weddings/anniversaries, portrait and creative photography and I teach photography and photo editing.

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Glenn Bartley

Nina, stunning images – as always!