Baby Birds and Cave Arms



Why hello there friends, hello. Not to be one of those talk-about-the-weather-all-the-time types, but crapballs! May 2nd and I was decked out in long underwear, gloves and hat again today. So confusing.(Above: with a caterpillar), below: hunkering down in some thistle)

Black-capped nestlings-they’ve hatched. Golden-cheeked Warblers have fledgies. This season is going way too fast. WAY TOO FAST! Everyone just needs to calm it on down!

(Above: Orange-crowned Warlber. Below: Bewick’s with a caterpillar) How do you feel about black widows? I have found three fatty females living in my safe zone (two were in the tarp covering my road bike, one under a cactus I have potted outside). Excuse me, ladies, but uh, not a good place to be. Oh yes, I also found of their beautiful egg sacs. I relocated all of them, plus their sac-o’-babies, but have been having a hoard of spider dreams/nightmares. One involved me frantically going through hundreds of black-capped nests, making sure they were free of black widows.

Speaking of dreams, here’s a good one. What does it mean when I have a dream that my right arm is actually a small cave that is housing miniature lizards? The baby lizards use a cliff bar wrapper as a blanket and ride on their mom’s heads. IN MY CAVE ARM. They talk to me and tell me they prefer the cliff bar wrappers to the Lara bar wrappers. My cave arm is not gross, by the way, it’s just a cool arm that is really a tiny cave full of . This is so weird.

Jill Wussow

Jill Wussow

, 31, is a seasonal field biologist, nature photographer and nomad. She has worked with several federally endangered bird species (including the Golden-cheeked , Black-capped Vireo and Piping Plover), sea turtles, and bats all over the United States. She is rarely in one place for more than a few months at a time and her whereabouts are often confusing. Field work has given her great opportunity to travel often and meshes with her passion for wildlife and nature photography perfectly. Through her photography, Jill hopes to convey her love and respect of the natural world.

Jill Wussow

Jill Wussow

Jill Wussow is a seasonal field biologist, nature photographer and nomad. She has worked with several federally endangered bird species (including the Golden-cheeked Warbler, Black-capped Vireo and Piping Plover), sea turtles, and bats all over the United States. She is rarely in one place for more than a few months at a time and her whereabouts are often confusing. Field work has given her great opportunity to travel often and meshes with her passion for wildlife and nature photography perfectly. Through her photography, Jill hopes to convey her love and respect of the natural world.

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