How Wolves Change Rivers

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There are “elk” pictured in this video when the narrator is referring to “deer.” This is because the narrator is British and the British word for “elk” is “red deer” or “deer” for short. The scientific report this is based on refers to elk so we wanted to be accurate with the truth of the story.

“When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the Universe.” – John Muir

When wolves were reintroduced to in the United States after being absent nearly 70 years, the most remarkable “trophic cascade” occurred. What is a trophic cascade and how exactly do wolves change rivers? explains in this movie remix.

This video was edited by Steve Agnos with editorial assistance from Chris Agnos (who also conceived the idea for the video) the brothers behind Sustainable Man.For more from Steve Agnos visit https://vimeo.com/steveagnos or https://vimeo.com/thesustainableman

For more from George Monbiot, visit http://www.monbiot.com/ and for more on “” visit http://bit.ly/1hKGemK and/or check out George Monbiot’s book Feral: the land, the sea and human life: http://amzn.to/1fjgirx

FAIR USE NOTICE: This video may contain copyrighted material. Such material is made available for educational purposes only. This constitutes a ‘fair use’ of any such copyrighted material as provided for in Title 17 U.S.C. section 106A-117 of the US Copyright Law.

Larry Jordan

Larry Jordan

is an avid birder and amateur photographer living on the Pacific Flyway near the Central Valley of Northern California. He is a board member of his local Audubon Society and is a bird and wildlife conservationist. Larry contributes to several wildlife conservation organizations and is a BirdLife International "Species Champion." He is also Habitat Manager for the Burrowing Owl Conservation Network, an organization dedicated to the protection and restoration of the Western Burrowing Owl population in the United States. Larry has been blogging about birds since September of 2007 at TheBirdersReport.com

Larry Jordan

Larry Jordan

Larry Jordan is an avid birder and amateur photographer living on the Pacific Flyway near the Central Valley of Northern California. He is a board member of his local Audubon Society and is a bird and wildlife conservationist. Larry contributes to several wildlife conservation organizations and is a BirdLife International "Species Champion." He is also Habitat Manager for the Burrowing Owl Conservation Network, an organization dedicated to the protection and restoration of the Western Burrowing Owl population in the United States. Larry has been blogging about birds since September of 2007 at TheBirdersReport.com

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Iain Gibson

Some possibility of semantic confusion in the introduction. "Elk" (Cervus canadensis) used to be considered as a subspecies of European Red Deer (Cervus elaphus), but they are now regarded as distinct species. The traditional confusion lies in the Moose (Cervus cervus) being referred to as "Elk" in the British Isles and Eurasia. The Red Deer is not alternatively called "deer" in Britain; the latter is a generic term for any species belonging to the family Cervidae. So if someone calls an Elk "a deer" they are not mistaken. Two nations divided by a common language?